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1800s pump organ


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yes Nan, I've already started on the television/radio/phonograph :) I sent an email to a piano restoration company that also specializes in antique pump organs asking about any service lit on it. I've never restored one before so I'm looking forward to the challenge!! These were pulled from an old farm house that was about to be torn down. I'm too happy to have them in my collection and glad they didn't pull the house down with them in it.

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I sent the serial number from the organ off to a restoration company and asked about it's age. They replied today and told me it was made in 1895. They also referred me to a book for the "do it yourself" on restoration. I'll pick the book up and have a peek. This won't be a weekend job by any means :D

 

I like the older stuff smiley. Nothing sounds as sweet as a vacuum tube amplifier :) today's solid state I find too harsh and choppy compared to the smooth harmonics of a tube amp.

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My son in law restored an old console 78 rpm tube model record player. It looks really good (he is a very meticulous worker), although the only records he can find for it sound like sandpaper.

I agree that the tube amps are just as good as the solid state stuff, although they tend to take a lot more current and create a lot of heat. I do not like the sound of over-driven tube pre-amps, but that's a personal thing....i like saxophones rather than buzzing guitar amp sounds.

I have done some furniture and piano refinishing and it just takes time, nothing impossible about it. You might have to hand make some of the parts (like if the bellows are leaking or broken), but it should give you many happy hours of puttering.

Keep us posted.

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hi engines ^_^

 

right now it's silent. the reservoir has come apart and the rubber covered fabric needs replacing on it and both bellows. before I replace that I'll have to tear it down and clean out the 100+ years of accumulated dirt and debris. I'll have to take a lot of pictures and keep parts carefully labeled and organized for clean up and re-assembly. I'm hoping there are no cracks in the sound board or the reed cell block which would make restoration take much more time and effort. the good thing about this piece is that it is complete and no one has messed with it before me. I'm guessing restoration will take approx. 6 months to a year. I'll post the photos as I progress with it. I haven't started on it other than a simple look over and I want to get the books on reed organ restoration to learn as much as I can before I begin. this is a project I don't want to mess up. I'll leave the finsih on the exterior as is to maintain value and patina which is expected in a piece of this vintage. the few dings and scratches in it add character imo :) the only bit I'll not be able to do is the missing ivory from a few of the keys so I'll send those into an expert for re-furbishing. since ivory is no longer available they'll most likely replace them with plastic.

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