Jump to content
K.COM Community

Smiley

Sysops
  • Content count

    830
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    23

About Smiley

  • Rank
    Sysop
  • Birthday August 29

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    North Carolina
  • Interests
    I love golf,fishing, music (especially folk, country, bluegrass, and classical), team sports, and science fiction. I enjoy duplicate contract bridge; I am ranked as a Club Master and am working towards District Master level. I play guitar and banjo and sing bass; for many years I was in a semi-professional old-time music band. And of course, I enjoy working with computers and chatting.

Recent Profile Visitors

16586 profile views
  1. Please join us for our next weekly literary chat in #readers_corner at 8:30 P.M. (EST) on February 24th 2018 -- 00:30 A.M. (GMT), February 25th -- for next discussion of: "Open Season at the Cafe' Rumba: by Julia Rocchi. The story is a recent offering of the Saturday Evening Post. It's a pleasant, somewhat humorous confection, and like most of the stories in the SEP, an easy, entertaining read. I think you will like it. The story is available on line at: http://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2017/12/29/post-fiction/contemporary-fiction-art-entertainment/open-season-cafe-rumba.html Webchat address: http://koach.com/cha...=readers_corner mIRC Users: /server -m chat3.koach.com:6667 -j #readers_corner I think the story will lead to a interesting chat with plenty of opportunity for entertaining digressions. I hope to see you all at the chat.
  2. Please join us for our weekly literary chat in #readers_corner at 8:30 P.M. (EST) on February 17th 2018 -- 00:30 A.M. (GMT), February 18th -- for our next discussion. By popular demand I have found another tale by Henry van Dyke (the author of our last story) to see if he was consistently a producer of stories that Nan likes or simply a one hit wonder. We will discuss van Dyke's story "Humoreske". I did some research on van Dyke and learned that following from Wikipedia: "Henry Jackson van Dyke Jr. was born on November 10, 1852, in Germantown, Pennsylvania. He was the son of Henry Jackson van Dyke Sr. (1822–1891), a prominent Brooklyn Presbyterian clergyman known in the antebellum years for his anti-abolitionist views. Henry graduated from Poly Prep Country Day School in 1869,[3]Princeton University, in 1873 and from Princeton Theological Seminary, 1877. He served as a professor of English literature at Princeton between 1899 and 1923." "Van Dyke chaired the committee that wrote the first Presbyterian printed liturgy, The Book of Common Worship of 1906. In 1908–09 Dr. van Dyke was a lecturer at the University of Paris. By appointment of President Woodrow Wilson, a friend and former classmate of van Dyke, he became Minister to the Netherlands and Luxembourg in 1913. Van Dyke resigned as ambassador at the beginning of December 1916 and returned to the United States. He was subsequently elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters and received many other honors as an author and educator. He died on April 10, 1933. He is buried in Princeton Cemetery." In my opinion, his education as a minister and long involvement with the Presbyterian Church had a large effected the moral issues evident in those of his stories which I have read. Many of his stories read more like essays than fictional tales, but all of his writings seem to contain a humanistic albeit very conservative Christian viewpoint reflected in the values espoused by his characters. This selection is more of a boy meets girl, boy loses girl, boy gets girl in the end type of story, but unlike the typical slick magazine treatment of young love, this story does not trigger the gag effect found in the stories finding their way into scripts for Halmark Movie Channel shows. I think you will enjoy it. The story is available on line at: https://americanliterature.com/author/henry-van-dyke/short-story/humoreske Webchat address: http://koach.com/cha...=readers_corner mIRC Users: /server -m chat3.koach.com:6667 -j #readers_corner I hope to see you all at the chat.
  3. Please join us for our weekly literary chat in #readers_corner at 8:30 P.M. (EST) on February 10th 2018 -- 00:30 A.M. (GMT), February 11th -- for a discussion of "The Keeper of the Light" by Henry va Dyke. In my opinion, this week's story is one of the best we will have discussed in the past year. Although it is a bit longer than our usual (20 pages instead of our usual 10 or so), it reads very quickly. It is an interesting tale based in a family's understanding the responsibility and the importance of weighing responsibility against convenience and living with the correct balance. I hope you will appreciate it as much as I. The story is available on line at: https://americanliterature.com/author/henry-van-dyke/short-story/the-keeper-of-the-light Webchat address: http://koach.com/cha...=readers_corner mIRC Users: /server -m chat3.koach.com:6667 -j #readers_corner Please note: because the story is a bit longer than our usual, you may want to start reading it earlier in the week, especially if you are used to reading the story an hour or so before our chat. It is well worth the extra time you devote to it. I hope to see you all at the chat.
  4. The Discussion originally scheduled for January 27th has been postponed until the following Saturday. Please join us for our next Readers' Corner discussion at 8:30 PM (EST) on February 3, 2018 [1:30 AM (GMT) February 4th for those in other time zones] for a discussion of the short story "Happy Birthday Patrick" by Christopher J. Adams. This story is science fiction, but it doesn't deal with the iconic bug eyed monsters or interstellar warfare normally associated with that genre. It looks at the relationship; between an artificial intelligence (think Data from Star Trek the Next Generation) and an aging crew-member of a space ship a long way from home. I think your will find the story compelling, and in some ways moving. I hope you enjoy it as much as I have, and I am certain that we will have fun exploring the sociological issues raised, The story is available on line at our oft visited source of contemporary fiction, East of the Web at: http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/HappBirt992.shtml As usual we will meet in the #readers_corner chatroom on Koach.com: Webchat: http://koach.com/cha...=readers_corner mIRC Users: /server -m chat3.koach.com:6667 -j #readers_corner I hope to see you all there, and lets recruit a few new chatters.
  5. Prudence advises you to stay way far away for there
  6. Please join us for our next Readers' Corner discussion at 8:30 PM (EST) on January 20th, 2018 [1:30 AM (GMT) January 21st for those in other time zones] for a discussion of the short story "Evolve" by Jeff Moskaritolo. This story is a change of pace, although I am not sure we have a pace to change. While we normally discuss stories with a melodramatic theme (i.e. one that focuses on some sort of physical action to bring about the resolution, this on is of a more introspective nature. It examines the lost loves of our protagonist but does not provide any solution to his problems. The author has a masters degree in fine arts for the same university that my daughter attended for her bachelor of education degree, not that that means the story is good, only that he attended a very good school. I believe we will have an interesting discussion about both the protagonist and his various and sundry crushes. The story is available on line fro Carve Magazine at : https://www.carvezine.com/story/2017-spring-moscaritolo As usual we will meet in the #readers_corner chatroom on Koach.com: Webchat: http://koach.com/cha...=readers_corner mIRC Users: /server -m chat3.koach.com:6667 -j #readers_corner I hope to see you all there.
  7. Please join us for our next Readers' Corner discussion at 8:30 PM (EST) on January 13th, 2018 [1:30 AM (GMT) January 14th for those in other time zones] for a discussion of the short story "Recluse" by Chet Martin. This story offers something to all of our regular members. It's a story about a man with severe agoraphobia who is cured by a novel treatment. I involves a benevolent ghost, although it is not a ghost story. It makes reverence to several historical authors, and eventually borrows from Koach's favorite (E. A. Poe) for the final solution. I think you will have some fun reading it (maybe even an lol or two). The story is available on line at: http://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2017/06/09/post-fiction/contemporary-fiction-art-entertainment/recluse.html As usual we will meet in the #readers_corner chatroom on Koach.com: Webchat: http://koach.com/cha...=readers_corner mIRC Users: /server -m chat3.koach.com:6667 -j #readers_corner I hope to see you all there.
  8. HAPPY NEW YEAR !!! Please join us for our first readers' chat of the new year in #readers_corner at 8:30 P.M. (EST) on December 6th, 2018 [01:30 A.M. (GMT)], December 7th, for a discussion of Human Pilots by J. B. Park. This story is set in a future time but is not exactly science fiction, although the story discusses the aftermath of wartime deployment on two wounded space pilots, it could describe the return of any wounded warrior to a medical center at home, so for those of you who don't like SciFi, pretend it is contemporary, and think to the the automated "crew members" as though they were humans. That having been said, I leave it to you to decide what kind of story it is, and whether you like it. The story is available on line at: http://strangehorizons.com/fiction/human-pilots/ As usual, the chat will be in the #readers_corner chat room on Koach.com Webchat: http://koach.com/chatlogin.php?chan=readers_corner mIRC Users: /server -m chat3.koach.com:6667 -j #readers_corner I hope to see you all at our chat. Don't forget to bring a friend.
  9. Man on toilet

    i bet the car was constipated because of snow frozen in the exhaust pipe. ROFL
  10. Best wishes for the Holiday Season. I hope you had a nice Hanukkah or Christmas and I wish you health, prosperity, and happiness for 2018. Please join us for our final chat of 2017 in #readers_corner at 8:30 P.M. (EST) on December 29th, 2017 -- 00:30 A.M. (GMT), December 30th, for a discussion of "Homecoming" by Zachary Lunn. This week's story is a sensitive description of a soldier's homecoming from the wars. I found it particularly interesting because I live but a "spit and a hollar" from the places mentioned in the tale (and because the author described those places accurately--as you by now know is one of my measures of a well crafted story. The tale speaks for itself although it may have slightly different interpretations on veterans than it does on civilians. Indeed, I expect that difference in viewpoint to make for an interesting discussion point during the chat. I know you will find the story interesting. The story is available at: https://www.carvezine.com/story/2017-fall-lunn Webchat: http://koach.com/cha...=readers_corner mIRC Users: /server -m chat3.koach.com:6667 -j #readers_corner Once more, on behalf of all of us at Koach.com, happiness for the holidays and blessings for a wonderful new year.
  11. Dead fly

    Are you having him stuffed and mounted?
  12. Dinner tonight

    The trouble with pictures of food is that you can't smell them. but it does look like it was good.
  13. Congratulations Dawn aka Chirp

    I want to see a picture. Congrats
  14. Holilday Greetings

    Season's Greetings
  15. Please join us for our next Readers' Corner discussion at 8:30 PM (EST) on December 16th [1:30 AM (GMT) December 17th for those in other time zones] for a discussion of Edgar Allan Poe's poem "The Raven" and his short story "The Tell Tale Heart". During our last meeting, those of us familiar with Poe's works indicated that Hammett's story "The Glass That Laughed" reminded us of the former's story "The Tell-Tale Heart". During the discussion it became the it became obvious that about half of our members were unfamiliar with Poe, or at least not well versed in the body of his prose and poetry. One reader asked if Poe were not the writer of that poem about a crow. After we scraped Koach off the ceiling, we explained that the poem, one of the most well known in American literature, is called "The Raven". We will devote our next chat to looking at Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart" as a possible early model for last weeks Hammett story, and to examining "The Raven" as a window into the psyche of the inventor of the detective story as well as a pioneer author of gothic horror tales. I think you will enjoy reading both the story and the poem (neither is so long as to be a burden), and the discussion should be fun. There are numerous web sites devoted to Poe's works--several associated with educational or literary research organizations and/or to organizations devoted to preserving the authors history and works. You can easily find both the story and the poem with a simple google search looking for the work by its title. I recommend you use the texts published on the PoeStories.com. They have some obsolete words annotated with definitions or explanations of the understood classical meanings of the symbols. The story is available online at: https://poestories.com/read/telltaleheart The poem is avaialbe at: https://poestories.com/read/raven As usual we will meet in the #readers_corner chatroom on Koach.com: Webchat: http://koach.com/cha...=readers_corner mIRC Users: /server -m chat3.koach.com:6667 -j #readers_corner I hope to see you all there.
×